Spring Break

Taken from pixabay

Hey, Reader Friends!

Just dropping you a line to let you know Diversity Between the Pages will be observing a Spring Break to usher in Easter. We will be back April 4th with a book spotlight.

Blessings to you!

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Book Spotlight: More Than Conquerors by Kathi Macias

Happy Wednesday! It’s almost Good Friday which means it’s almost EASTER!! Hallelujah! To paraphrase a popular sermon, “It’s Wednesday but Sunday is coming!” So thankful that we have a Savior who purchased with His blood “persons from every tribe, language, people, and nation”! (Rev 5:9)

Ahem. Sorry about that little mini-sermon there – a freebie for all y’all. 😉

Today, I’m continuing to spotlight the Extreme Devotion series from Kathi Macias with a look at More Than Conquerors.

About the Book

more than conquerorsTrue love ignites their passionate pursuit of His call

With violent crime on the rise and the political climate changing throughout certain parts of Mexico, the opportunity for open Christian witness, particularly in some areas of Chiapas State, is rapidly decreasing. Hector Rodriguez pastors a small church in the tourist-popular border town of Tijuana. He also routinely carries Bibles deeper into the hostile areas of Mexico, where he ministers despite increasing difficulty and persecution.

Hector’s mother accompanied him on one of those trips and felt God called her to stay in the little village of San Juan Chamula, where she uses the Scriptures to teach reading to the families who are open to it. In retaliation for Hector’s bringing the Bibles into areas hostile to Christians and in an effort to dissuade him from continuing to expand his ministry there, Hector’s mother is murdered.

Hector must decide if he will continue his work despite his worries about protecting his wife and children.

goodreads | amazon

About the Author

KathiMaciasPhoto-200x300Kathi Macias is a multi-award winning writer who has authored more than 50 books and ghostwritten several others. A former newspaper columnist and string reporter, Kathi has taught creative and business writing in various venues and has been a guest on many radio and television programs. Kathi is a popular speaker at churches, women’s clubs and retreats, and writers’ conferences. She won the 2008 Member of the Year award from AWSA (Advanced Writers and Speakers Association) and was the 2011 Author of the Year from BooksandAuthors.net. Her novel set in China, Red Ink, was named Golden Scrolls 2011 Novel of the Year and was also a Carol Award Finalist; her October 2012 release, Unexpected Christmas Hero, was named 2012 Book of the Year by BookandAuthors.net. Kathi “Easy Writer” Macias lives in Homeland, CA, with her husband.

Kathi is passionate about The Voice of the Martyrs and Open Doors. To learn more about the persecuted church, please visit VOM’s website and Open Doors Website.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest


What about you? What do you think you would do in Hector’s position?

Book Spotlight: No Greater Love by Kathi Macias

I have recently the Extreme Devotion series by Kathi Macias and I’m looking forward to making my way through each book. Today, I’m featuring the first book, No Greater Love!

About the Book

no greater loveForbidden romance, an unlikely martyr and an even more unlikely hero. Orphaned four years earlier when their parents, active in the African National Congress (ANC) movement against apartheid, were murdered—16-year-old Chioma and her 15-year-old brother Masozi now live and work on an Afrikaner family’s farm.

When Chioma and Andrew, the farm owner’s son, find themselves attracted to one another, tragedy revisits their lives. Chioma escapes to join an ANC rebel band in her effort to survive and gain revenge for her family and culture. When cultures clash in life-or-death struggles, Chioma must choose between violence and revenge—or forgiveness and selfless love.

Loosely based on historical events and set near Pretoria, South Africa, in the violent upheaval prior to ANC leader Nelson Mandela’s release from prison in 1990 and his ascendance to the presidency of South Africa, this story of forbidden romance produces an unlikely martyr who is replaced by one even more unlikely.

Goodreads | Amazon

About the Author

KathiMaciasPhoto-200x300Kathi Macias is a multi-award winning writer who has authored more than 50 books and ghostwritten several others. A former newspaper columnist and string reporter, Kathi has taught creative and business writing in various venues and has been a guest on many radio and television programs. Kathi is a popular speaker at churches, women’s clubs and retreats, and writers’ conferences. She won the 2008 Member of the Year award from AWSA (Advanced Writers and Speakers Association) and was the 2011 Author of the Year from BooksandAuthors.net. Her novel set in China, Red Ink, was named Golden Scrolls 2011 Novel of the Year and was also a Carol Award Finalist; her October 2012 release, Unexpected Christmas Hero, was named 2012 Book of the Year by BookandAuthors.net. Kathi “Easy Writer” Macias lives in Homeland, CA, with her husband.

Kathi is passionate about The Voice of the Martyrs and Open Doors. To learn more about the persecuted church, please visit VOM’s website and Open Doors Website.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest


What most interests you about this book?

Book Spotlight: Though I Stumble by Kim Cash Tate

Happy Hump Day!

I hope you’re having an awesome week. We at Diversity have a new book spotlight for you. We’re featuring Kim Cash Tate’s Though I Stumble, book one in the Promises of God series.


About the Book

The Blurb: “Four women, one weekend, and their lives will never be the same.

Stephanie London thought she’d heard from God when she moved to Hope Springs, N.C. But a tragedy in that small town left her soul desolate. Now her husband’s inattentiveness has pushed her over the edge. Bereft of hope, she travels home to St. Louis as a women’s ministry conference kicks off. Though less than enthused to attend, new friendships offer strength and light. But what happens when the weekend ends and real life begins again?

Treva Langston grieves still the loss of her husband of twenty-two years. Now, two years later, her heart is breaking again as her oldest daughter’s travails come to light. Traveling from DC to St. Louis for a women’s conference seems the last thing she should do, given the circumstances. But in St. Louis her path crosses with someone new—and her world turns upside down. Will it only lead to more heartbreak?

Jillian Mason can’t wait to attend the Living Word women’s conference. She’s done their Bible studies for years and expects God to show up in an amazing way. But the weekend delivers something unexpected—a discovery about her husband. As the state of her marriage hangs in the balance, Jillian is suddenly anxious about returning home.

Faith Langston has always been a girl after God’s heart. She loves Living Word studies and registered early for the conference. But at the end of her college sophomore year, she finds herself in circumstances she never imagined—with a heart that has strayed from God. She makes it to St. Louis nonetheless, with her boyfriend in tow—but how will she find her way back to God?

Four women in different seasons of life converge at a women’s conference—with a theme that charges them to run “in hot pursuit” for Christ. But how do they run when challenges seem insurmountable? And can they help one another navigate the difficult terrain?”

Links: Amazon, B&N, Goodreads


About the Author

KIM CASH TATE is the author of several books, including Cling (2017) and If I Believe (2017). A former practicing attorney, she is also a Bible teacher and is currently doing a study on First Samuel on YouTube. She’s been married to her husband Bill for more than two decades, and they live in St. Louis with their two young adult children. You can find Kim online at kimcashtate.com and on social media @kimcashtate.

Follow: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube

Author Interview: Cara Luecht- Soul’s Cry

Good Monday. It’s time for another author interview. Today, we’ll get to know Cara Luecht.


About the Book

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Ione has everything she’d wanted with her busy shop filled to the brim with sumptuous fabrics, gossiping debutants, and a neatly increasing profit margin. Not to mention the unexpected attention of a man who doesn’t know her past.
And then the letter dropped from the mail slot onto to lush carpet. He was back. And the abuse, the shame, rushes in, reminding her of how unworthy she really is.
Miriam also has everything she’d wanted—and with a baby on the way, for the first time in her life, she has everything to lose. When she’d been alone, the future had held promise, but now with her life full, it also holds fear.
Unwilling to risk a vision of loss, Miriam stops painting what will be…right before Ione needs it most.

Available on Amazon


About the Author

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Award winning author, Cara Luecht, lives in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin with her husband, David, and their children. In addition to freelance writing and marketing, Cara works as an English Instructor for a local college. Cara graduated summa cum laude with a B.A. in English Literature from the University of Wisconsin and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Currently, Cara is studying for a Masters of Divinity at Fuller Theological Seminary.

http://www.caraluecht.com/

https://www.facebook.com/author.cara.luecht/

 


Interview

Terri: Thank you so much for joining us today. Soul’s Cry is the third book in the series, but Ione is introduced in a previous book. Did you always know that you wanted to tell her story?

Cara: I always knew I wanted to write Ione’s story. In fact, I had some trouble when I first began writing the series, because I wanted to go deeper into Ione’s character than I was able to as she was supposed to be a supporting character in Soul Painter. I’ve looked forward to writing Soul’s Cry for a while.

Terri: Soul’s Cry seems to be a strong finish to your Portraits of Grace series. And all three stories have very different heroines. Did you find it difficult to write outside your race? How did you overcome those difficulties? 

Cara: I found it very difficult to write outside my race, but not because I didn’t feel I could connect to Ione; rather, because I was intimidated by the idea of making a mistake. Also, the current dialogue about whether or not a white person should even try to write an African American character messed with my mind a bit.

I remember one particularly difficult point when I realized that one of the African American characters needed to identify as African American. This seems a silly problem, no one goes around thinking “I’m white” or “I’m black,” but we all carry inner dialogues. For example, my own inner dialogue might question if a white person should try to write a novel from the perspective of a minority. See what happened? In my thought process, I identified myself as white.

One of my African American characters was thinking about another, and the thought came up about success despite racial barriers. But no one would say something in their head, like “gee, racial barriers really didn’t hold him back!” That would be silly. The inner dialogue needed to be more natural. Consequently, my character needed to self-identify—but how would an African American in the 1890s do so? Would they use the word Negro? Black?

To get to the bottom of this problem, I enlisted the help of an African American friend who also happens to be a student of literature. She helped me, but in the end, I think I made this more of a problem than it needed to be, simply due to my own insecurity.

There were a lot of these kinds of moments in writing this book. I think one of the reasons is that I consider it such a privilege to have a publisher who trusted me to write outside of my race in a market that is not famous for its diversity.

Terri: I greatly appreciate your dedication not to make a mistake. It shows that you care about your African American readers. There is a quite a bit of buzz about diversity in the Christian publishing industry. In particular, books with African Americans on the covers being less appealing. What was your reaction when you first saw the cover and why do think it was important to have Ione on the cover?

Cara: Because I am white, I will never know what it feels like to grow up in a culture where I am not represented. And frankly, I can’t even believe that this is a question that we still have to deal with. It’s the 21st century, for Pete’s sake. How is it even possible that this has to be a question? And that it is a huge question in the CHRISTIAN industry…there are no words…

But it’s true. I was beyond grateful to publish this book with a company who was willing to take the risk (even saying that makes me angry). They never questioned that Ione needed to be on the cover, and even though I know there will be some readers out there who look at her picture, and then look at my white face on the back of the cover, and then roll their eyes because I wrote outside my race, I am proud of her, and of my publisher (Roseanna White did a beautiful job designing the cover!).

If you’ll forgive a longer answer, I’d like to tell you a bit more…The racism that is inherent in this conversation goes beyond what people can see. Behind the scenes, finding the model for Ione was difficult. There was never a question that an African American woman would be on the cover, but when time came to sort through potential pictures, and to find (modern) models in Victorian dress (so that we could have a cover in full color), the only options that came up with the search terms “African American Victorian Women” were women dressed in Burlesque fashion.

I was appalled.

There was a thriving, wealthy, African American society in most urban areas of this time period. In fact, if you google “African American Victorian woman 1890,” you will find all sorts of vintage examples of beautifully dressed women. While they didn’t make up the majority of the population, they were there. However, they have been forgotten to history because they didn’t match with the imagined picture of people who had recently come out of slavery. The black and white photos prove they existed, but there is so little need for this picture in modern times, that the models are almost non-existent.

The truth is, many in the African American community were well-educated, wealthy, and making a substantial difference in the lives of the people in their communities.

In addition to writing, I teach college English at a technical college. When I made this inadvertent discovery, I couldn’t help but wonder how different the lives of my students would have been had the been shown a picture of their ancestors that they could have been proud of– people who stood as historical role models instead of the only photos being of slaves.

We have so much work to do.

Terri: I totally understand the challenge of finding African Americans for cover art. Many people don’t realize that is a real problem. It is a small step to the work that needs to be done in the Christian publishing industry to diversity. Ione is presented as a strong woman who will do whatever she needs to provide for her family. How hard was it to relate to her?

Cara: Ione is the woman I would hope to be if I ever found myself in a situation like hers. She found herself in dire circumstances, but she never lost sight of the priority of looking after others.

We hear all the time about women who end up the victims of trafficking, and sometimes what they go through is so brutal, they end up addicted to drugs just to deal with the pain. Ione, in my mind was different. She was victimized, she had to deal with the guilt and the fall-out from some of her decisions, but it never destroyed her. It never stole the part of her that tells her, even in the most horrendous of circumstances, that she can still help others.

I think Ione taught me that in order to be effective for those we love, we need to feel that we have value…otherwise what do we have to give? With Ione, I created a picture of someone who was hurt unimaginably, but never lost sight of her own value. I relate to her in that I aspire to be like her.

Terri: Ione is an inspiring woman in her strength and love for her family. She is also a talented seamstress. What research did you have to do gain insight on her craft?

Cara: My family has always been crafty, and while I am not a seamstress, I am familiar with sewing. I also love to look at photos and drawings of vintage dresses. Additionally, because of my love for historical fiction, I think that this time period, along with the clothes, customs, etc., is forever a part of my imaginary world.

When I write, I do so with a running movie in my head. That way, I write about what I see and hear and smell. Most of my research is done at the beginning of the project, because if it wasn’t, I’d never be able to develop the movie.

Terri: I also have met few crafts that I didn’t like. I’m sure all your research would make an interesting Pinterest board. If you could write in another genre, what would it be or have historicals completely captured your heart?

Cara: I might try science fiction or even apocalyptic fiction. Actually, I’ve started playing with a steampunk. But I love historical. When I read, I want to be transported to another world. Same thing goes with writing. In order to keep my attention, it needs to be something that I can build in my mind. Every time I try to write contemporary, I just get bored with it.

Terri: I’ve always loved Steampunk. I don’t think it’s gotten all of the attention it deserves. When did you first know you wanted to be a writer?

Cara: I never even thought about it until I was in my 30s. I was not one of those people who grew up knowing what she wanted to be. In fact, I’m pretty sure I will never figure out what I want to be when I grow up😊 When I look back, though, I realize that I always read like a writer, and I always loved literature.

Terri: Flexibility is essential when God is leading you. What’s next for you?

Cara: I’m working on another historical set in Colorado in the 1860s. I will amp up the suspense in this one. That being said, I am not progressing as quickly as I would like because I am also in school working toward my Masters of Divinity. At some point, I am hoping to tackle some non-fiction.

Terri: God speed with the degree, and we look forward to reading your new series. Thank for chatting with us.

Summer Diverse Christian Fiction Reads

Looking for a book before heading to the beach or your favorite summer vacation location? Or maybe you’re looking for a read to devour on your staycation. Whichever the case, diverse Christian fiction is a great choice. Here are some titles to enrich your summer reading:


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Cherish You So (Savannah Sweethearts Book 4)

Jan Thompson

Blurb:

Having come to terms with his disability, business empire heir Dante Dupree has it all, but Nadine Saylor is too busy to be impressed with his accolades, and too busy to fall in love. Yet, love keeps knocking on her door…

Dante’s Dream…

Billionaire bachelor Dante Dupree has arrived. Living with paraplegia, he now has a state-of-the-art wheelchair to handle his disability, and a private jet to take him across the world to buy up smaller companies for the Hot Dupree global hot sauce empire. And the best news yet for his career: He has been handpicked to be the next CEO of Hot Dupree, Inc., and he’s going to inherit a fifth of the multi-billion-dollar family fortune. He has it all.

At the end of an international business trip, Dante stops in Savannah for merger talks and to visit his pregnant sister. Exuberant and on top of his game, single and free, the center of attention among ladies, and recently voted one of the top ten most eligible young billionaires in the world, self-confident Dante suddenly finds himself in a predicament he cannot solve: he’s in love.

But he can’t get her attention. She is not impressed at all with his accolades.

Nadine’s Norms…

Nadine Saylor is busy, busy, busy. Her job as a virtual assistant to clients traveling through six or seven time zones keeps her on her toes around the clock. The last thing she needs right now is Dante Dupree flinging signals and invitations at her, even though he did look handsome in his Lagerfeld tuxedo at his sister’s wedding eleven months ago.

Nadine keeps telling herself that her calendar is full. There’s no room for romance. Dante can go find someone else to be his Flavor of the Month.

When one of Dante’s professional problems intersects with Nadine’s personal predicament, they find themselves thrown together to sort out these chapters of their lives. Has God put them together in this place for such a time as this?

Goodreads


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A Royal Reunion

Viola Mae Holt

Blurb:

Girls like her don’t get to be Cinderella…

Emi Adebayo is a servant’s daughter. On the island of Yedan that means she has no social rank. She knows that aspiring above her station only leads to disappointment. It’s hard not to hope though when the one thing she wants is the love of the prince.

His Royal Highness Prince Taiwo of Yedan takes his duty to his country seriously. Nothing distracts him. That’s true until the only girl he’s ever wanted comes back into his life.

Despite the friendship they once shared, Emi and Prince Taiwo come from two different worlds. Disapproval, judgment, and shame caused her to run from him once. When they meet again, can they find love or will fear keep them apart?

Find out in this prologue novella set in the Royals of Yedan universe.

Goodreads


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click to go to Goodreads

Mourner’s Bench

Sanderia Faye

Blurb:

At the FirstBaptist Church of Maeby, Arkansas, the sins of the child belonged to the parents until the child turned thirteen. Sarah Jones was only eight years old in the summer of 1964, but with her mother Esther Mae on eight prayer lists and flipping around town with the generally mistrusted civil rights organizers, Sarah believed it was time to get baptized and take responsibility for her own sins. That would mean sitting on the mourner’s bench come revival, waiting for her sign, and then testifying in front of the whole church.
But first, Sarah would need to navigate the growing tensions of small-town Arkansas in the 1960s. Both smarter and more serious than her years (a “fifty-year-old mind in an eight-year-old body,” according to Esther), Sarah was torn between the traditions, religion, and work ethic of her community and the progressive civil rights and feminist politics of her mother, who had recently returned from art school in Chicago. When organizers from the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) came to town just as the revival was beginning, Sarah couldn’t help but be caught up in the turmoil. Most folks just wanted to keep the peace, and Reverend Jefferson called the SNCC organizers “the evil among us.” But her mother, along with local civil rights activist Carrie Dilworth, the SNCC organizers, Daisy Bates, attorney John Walker, and indeed most of the country, seemed determined to push Maeby toward integration.
With characters as vibrant and evocative as their setting, Mourner’s Bench is the story of a young girl coming to terms with religion, racism, and feminism while also navigating the terrain of early adolescence and trying to settle into her place in her family and community.

Goodreads


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A Rebel in Jerico

Mini Milan

Blurb:

After years of preparing for marriage, Catalina Santé is interested in little more than making a good match. And why not? She’s young, beautiful, educated… everything a wealthy man should want. However, a tragic accident will leave her with less than a marriage proposal— she’s fighting for her very life! Matthew Martin spends most of his time just trying to fit into American society. It’s one of the reasons he became a deputy. Willing to risk it all in order to protect Catalina, he can’t imagine what that entails… until she’s abducted and sold to a Mexican saloon, where a border battle rages between two towns. Can love and faith survive in such a harsh place? Will Matthew even be able to save Catalina?

Goodreads


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The Soldier’s Suprise Family

Jolene Navarro

Texas state trooper Garrett Kincaid is a lone wolf—until he becomes an instant father of two young children. The former solider never knew he had a son…or that his little boy has a baby sister with nowhere to go. His landlady, lovely widow Anjelica Ortega-Garza, offers to help, and suddenly Garrett’s life is all about nap schedules and baby bottles and trying to make his traumatized son smile. Falling for Anjelica isn’t part of the plan. Yet even Garrett can’t deny that love has begun building a family of four right around him.

Goodreads

Need more suggestions? Check out our Diverse Book Recommendations page.

Happy reading.

Book Review: Hand in His by Cynthia Marcano

TGIF, Diverse Reader Friends!

I pray this week has been a blessing to you. Today I’m sharing a book review of Hand in His. I read this book earlier in the year and was thrilled to see a Latina featured.

Check it out!


About the Book

“The man intended for Nicole De León will come along when she is good and ready and not a minute sooner, no matter how desperately the older women of her church try to find her a match. She simply does not have the time to date with Nursing courses, her best friend’s wedding, work and volunteering at church. If and when she finds the time to find love, it will be with a man in love with Jesus and most certainly not the flirty best man that makes her heart do funny things.

Drew Wells is adamant that falling in love is a waste of time, as is organized religion. As long as he has a say, neither are in his future and the closest he will ever get to either is being the best man at his cousin’s wedding and spending a week with the bible thumping bridal party. The beautiful brunette bridesmaid is fun to flirt with but she will most certainly not make him want to think about settling down or worse, become a holy-roller.

Can either stop their hearts from betraying their minds?”

Links: Amazon, Goodreads

Follow Author: Website, Twitter


Review

I was tickled pink to read Nicole’s story. It’s not too often I read a book with a Latina heroine. It was nice to see another culture and another part of the world. I’ve never been to Jersey so I enjoyed the description. The food, family, and secondary characters added to this heartwarming read.

My favorite: the faith element. Nicole had to walk the path of self-examination. Was she too judgmental? Too hard on Drew? It’s a question that a lot of long-standing Christians must ask ourselves. Too often we forget what it was like before we knew Christ. I loved how Ms. Marcano dealt with this subject.

I also enjoyed Drew’s faith journey. It was such a strong plot line that the ethnicities took a background place in my reader’s mind. There’s a moment in here that melted my heart.

This is not the first book in the series, but the book completely stands alone. I say this because I didn’t read the first ones in the series. 🙂


Review by Toni Shiloh

Open Discussion – Diverse Setting

Happy Saturday, Diverse Reader Friends!

I hope you had an awesome week. I’ve been mulling over potential topics all week and finally, I settled on one.

Y’all, this one is something that falls into stereotypes, yet has truth with it. And isn’t that the problem with stereotypes? Which leads me to the question: what is the appropriate setting for people of color characters?

I think some people believe ethnically diverse characters can only appear in books where the setting itself is diverse. You know places like, Chicago, D.C., New York, etc. But in some genres small-town places are the ticket, and you don’t always imagine people of color in them.

Does that mean you can’t place them there? Let’s face it, there are small towns in the US devoid of diversity. It’s not a stereotype, it’s a fact and if a reader can’t imagine people of color in those locations, it’s not a big surprise.

Still, sometimes the problem is with the reader. My first book, A Life to Live, was set in Nottingham, England. I actually had a person of color complain in their review that Black people weren’t in England.

But isn’t that what diversity is about? Showing the world what’s real? Widening ones’ knowledge of places?

Nevertheless, I questioned my choice, even though I’ve been to England. Met my husband in England and saw other people of color there. After a brief time, I decided to choose more obscure places. Could you imagine a book where people of color were in Montana? Because the assumption is there are no people of color there, right? Well in my novellete in A Spring of Weddings collection, that’s exactly what I did.

The great thing about books is they widen our perspective. Loose the scales over our eyes. Setting is just as important in the diversity discussion as the people we’re portraying.

Let’s open the discussion. Authors: what is the unusual setting you’ve placed people of color in? Did you fear reader backlash?

Readers: What’s the most interesting setting you’ve read that featured people of color? Was it unbelievable or did it give you a deeper perspective?


Discussion written by Toni Shiloh

Book Review: Looking Glass Lies by Varina Denman

TGIF!! Hope you’ve had a great week! Today, I’m sharing my review of Varina Denman’s Looking Glass Lies. Have you read it?


About the Book

Blurb: A poignant and relatable novel, Looking Glass Lies captures the war women wage against themselves, and the struggle to see beauty reflected in a mirror not distorted by society’s unrelenting expectations.

For most of her adult life, Cecily Ross has compared herself to other women—and come up short. After a painful divorce from her emotionally abusive husband, Cecily returns to her hometown of Canyon, Texas, looking to heal.

But coming home isn’t what she expects. In a town as small as Canyon, her pain is difficult to escape—especially with her model-perfect ex–sister-in-law working at the town’s popular coffee-shop hangout. With help from her father, a support group, and an old friend who guides her to see her own strengths, Cecily may have a shot at overcoming her insecurities and learning to love again.

The true test comes when tragedy strikes, opening Cecily’s eyes to the harmfulness of her distorted views on beauty—and giving her the perfect opportunity to find peace at last.

Links: Amazon, B&N, Goodreads


Review

Looking Glass Lies is a poignant read that will transform the reader. Cecily Ross struggles with her self-image. I think everyone can identify with that issue. I loved how Varina Denman tackled the subject. She laid it all out, exploring every nook and cranny of this issue. She also included a diverse group of secondary characters.

Shanty is half-Black and half-Asian. Her husband is from Latino descent. Shanty is the one who motivates and encourages Cecily to love herself just the way she is. I loved her character and I love that she has her own social media page.

If you’ve ever struggled with self image, please read this book. It will encourage you and help you see that God created you just the way you need to be.


About the Author

Varina Denman enjoys writing fiction about women and the unique struggles they face. Her novels include the Mended Hearts trilogy: Jaded, Justified, and Jilted, as well as her latest release, Looking Glass Lies. She seems to have a knack for describing small town life, and her debut novel, Jaded, won the ACFW Genesis Contest, the BRMCWC Selah Award, and the INSPYs Bloggers’ Award for Excellence in Faith-Driven Literature.

Varina attended three universities over a span of five years, majoring in four subjects and earning zero degrees. However, she can now boast sixteen years as a home educator, volunteering in her local cooperative where she has taught numerous subjects including creative writing and literature. Varina lives in North Texas where she volunteers in local marriage and family ministry. She is represented by Jessica Kirkland of Kirkland Media Management.

Follow: Website, Blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest