Book Review: Chasing the Wind by Paula Scott

Hi, readers! This series blew me away with its vibrant culture, rich history, and authentic faith. I learned so much about California’s journey to statehood and the story is intense!

About the Book

Chasing the Wind by Paula ScottA beautiful, half-Indian girl raised by the Californios finds her fate intertwined with an American frontiersman haunted by his past in 1850 California.

As California comes to statehood amidst the madness of the gold rush, Isabella Vasquez must wed a buckskin-clad American who wins her in a card game. Though their union is passionate, Isabella soon finds herself abandoned in a brothel, where she rises to fame as a singer known as the Bluebird. Yet because of her Indian blood, the Bluebird will always be bought and sold in the white man’s world. When more is demanded of the Bluebird than just singing, Isabella flees to Fort Ross in search of her Russian father and her own race of people.

Peter Brondi has battled Indians all his life. The last thing he wants is a half-Indian wife. While taming the West with Kit Carson and John C. Fremont, Peter has fought the Mexican War and lost his beloved fiancée, Maggie, to his half-Indian brother, Paul. To satisfy his father’s dying wish, Peter vows to find his brother and put an end to the hate that’s between them. But when history repeats itself and Paul steals Isabella away, Peter must come to terms with his past and the animosity he holds against all Indians, including his half-brother and the wife he has forsaken.

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California Rising series

  

 

My Thoughts

Like many historical fiction fans, I go absolutely gaga over rarely explored (or new-to-me) settings! While territorial California isn’t the exclusive setting (and it has likely been the destination of a few stories I’ve read in the past), the California Rising series is an ode to California’s roots and growing pains.

This series is loaded with nuggets of historical content related to and preceding the transitional period of the 1840-50s. The cultural climate is vibrant and rich with several diverse backgrounds thoroughly represented. Many race related injustices and tragedies are mentioned or explored yet the beauty of what makes each culture unique is respected and revered.

Saints and sinners alike fight temptations and even unseen forces. In my opinion, California Rising’s crowning glory is its engaging tales of good versus evil and God’s boundless redeeming grace which covers the heights, width, and depths of human depravity. While I was entertained by the overall story in Until the Day Breaks and Far Side of the SeaChasing the Wind touched my heart.

Readers who don’t shy away from the raw truth of sin and darkness will especially enjoy this series. Paula Scott has a uniquely straightforward writing style with complex interwoven story threads and I look forward to her future work.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher and was under no obligation to post a review. The opinions expressed are my own. THIS REVIEW WAS ORIGINALLY POSTED ON FAITHFULLY BOOKISH.

 

About the Author

Paula ScottPaula began her writing career as a civilian contracted to write for the United States Air Force’s newspaper and magazines. Later, she wrote feature stories for a daily California newspaper.

A fifth-generation Californian, Paula’s great great grandmother came to California in a covered wagon and married a California farmer.

Paula’s family has been farming ever since. Paula works on her family’s farm, writes historical fiction, and blogs about life, love, and farming at her website.

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Share your thoughts about this book or time period, reader friends!

 

 REVIEW BY BETH ERIN