Book Spotlight: Zimrah, Dream Singer by Susan Valles

Good Morning and Happy Monday, reader friends!

Today, we’re bringing a book spotlight to you. This book is Biblical fiction written by Susan Valles. Please welcome Susan to our blog today by saying “hello” in the comments below.

Enjoy this spotlight on her book: Zimrah, Dream Singer!


About the book:

In the land of ancient Israel, in the days just before the miracles of Jesus the Christ began, there lived an orphan girl named Zimrah. A foreigner and a slave with no knowledge of who she is or where she came from, Zimrah has many demons to overcome.

Living among people that fear and reject her because of her foreign features and strange grey eyes, she finds shelter in the last Jewish house in a City of Refuge only to find that her master suffers demons of his own. She soon discovers that these dark spirits who have tormented her all her life, can not only be battled, but can be defeated when she begins to heed the gentle Voice that speaks to her in her dreams.

Following the Voice, Zimrah finds a lyre and the songs that have been hidden for her in her dreams. Singing these dream songs lead her to the One true God, determine the path to her heart’s desires, and define the map to her future and her destiny.

Assisted by Rebecca and Garbar, the Warrior Angels that guard and protect her, and the love of a Roman officer who she must learn to trust, Zimrah discovers that her life has much more significance than she could have ever imagined. Her obedience and courage will shake the heavens and stir the hearts of all who touch Zimrah, Dream Singer.

Buy the book on Amazon.


About the author:

 For the past twelve years, Susan Valles has been using her gifts to lead others into the presence of God through worship. Touched by this presence in a profound way at the age of ten, Susan developed a deep hunger to help others experience the love of God and the majesty of His presence. Writing, singing, playing the guitar and songwriting became extensions of this hunger, an outlet for the passion Holy Spirit was stirring inside her to bring the lost and hurting into the healing embrace of the loving Father.

“For God speaks again and again, though people do not recognize it. He speaks in dreams, in visions of the night, when deep sleep falls on people as they lie on their beds.”~ Job 33:14-15

This has been Susan’s experience. Abba Father speaks to her in dreams and visions, giving her inspiration for creativity. Many of her songs have been written in this way, and this is how the idea for her latest project, Zimrah, Dream Singer began. This novel, a culmination Susan’s personal experience in her relationship with God, as well as a few of the songs (He continues to give), was the next step in a faith walk that began with her first album Small Beginnings, and continued with On My Way. The Lord put her on a path of obedience and simply learning to trust and follow has brought her great joy.

Susan’s prayer for this continuing journey, as she writes the second (Zimrah, Dream Walker) and third book of the Zimrah series in that many more will understand the true intimacy that comes with the knowledge of the Living God. Her desire is that through these books and songs many will know God and His benefits, that freedom from fear, and other strongholds is the result of living as citizens in the Kingdom of God.

For, as our beautiful Savior Jesus says, “I came that they may have and enjoy life, and have it in abundance [to the full, till it overflows].” ~John 10:10 AMP

Hallelujah, Amen!

Visit www.myplaceofrest.com for info, videos, CDs and more!

Follow Susan on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube.

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Author Interview: C. D. Gill

Happy Monday!

Thanks for stopping by Diversity Between the Pages. Today, we’re bringing you an interview with the author of On Wings of an Avalanche. It released last week. Have you had an opportunity to read it or at least put it on your TBR pile? Meet C.D. Gill and show some love in the comments!


About the Author

The Blurb: “A struggling charity hospital, visa troubles, and an arrest at gunpoint leave Dr. Madison Cote at the mercy of the corrupt Malian police. Rescue comes at a price when a warlord demands that she traffic drugs in exchange for her freedom and his protection. When the French embassy enlists her to relay intelligence on the warlord, Dr. Cote’s trapped as a civilian double agent, facing an immediate death sentence if she’s caught.

Royal Air Force recruit Chip Chapman needs to prove to himself that he can be more than his abusive father. A week before basic training, an avalanche replaces his dreams of heroism with raw survivalism. Taken captive for his piloting skills, Chip plans to escape until he uncovers war crimes no human could ignore.

Both pressed into servitude, Dr. Cote and Chip forge a desperate alliance. But with lives in the balance, their allegiances and honor will be the least of the sacrifices required to topple a warlord.”

Links: Amazon, AppleBooks, Kobo, Goodreads


Interview

Toni: Welcome, C.D.! Since I’m so excited to talk about your book, I’ll just jump right in with the questions. What made you decide to pick Mali as a setting for On Wings of an Avalanche?

C.D: I chose Mali, because of the drug trafficking problem, and the proximity to Europe. It has a unique feature of being Muslim in the north closer to the desert and “Christian” in the south. So I was able to separate the crimes from religion mostly.

Toni: Have you ever been to Africa? If so, can you tell us a little about your experience there?

C.D: Yes! I went to Zambia in 2015! The travel was really long coming from the US, but my husband and I had the privilege of seeing life “in the bush” in Zambia. Pretty quickly outside of Lusaka, the roads turned to dirt with huge holes. The journey which would have taken 8 hours with paved roads took two 12-hr days to get to our destination. We stayed near locals, visited local schools, the missionary hospital, the hydro project which provides electricity to the area, and the markets. It was so bizarre to see so many people in the bush with cell phones yet they still lacked things like running water, toilets, refrigeration, etc. I was so glad we went with people who knew the area, because we would have had no idea where to stop for food or fuel. Those things aren’t easily available outside the city because people don’t have the money to pay a day’s wage for “fast food” nor do they all have vehicles that need fuel.

Toni: That sounds amazing. I still would love to visit the continent. What kind of research did you have to do for this novel?

C.D: All kinds! I went in depth into Mali’s culture, landscape, political structure, medical rules, and transportation. I researched the Olympics in 2008, bugs, aviation, birth rates, medicine, language, gift-giving, the drug trade, child soldiers, food, license plates, roads—you name it. I looked into it. And it was lots of fun!

Toni: You make it sound fun. 🙂 Did you find it difficult to portray the African culture considering your own ethnic background?

C.D: It was super important to me that I not misrepresent Africa as a whole or even present it as something “lesser than.” For example, one warlord doesn’t mean that the country is full of them, just like one gang story doesn’t mean the US is only gangs. Africa isn’t lesser than. It’s just different. I didn’t want people to read this book and think that “West is best.” In Zambia, healthcare is given to the citizens, as is the land. They expect things for free from the government. In the US, being given things goes against the ideal of work hard and earn what you want. So yes, it was difficult, because there are things I wanted to include in the story but refrained because the understanding of the full culture was difficult to fit into one story.

Toni: Makes perfect sense. I’m glad you took care with your portrayal. What is the one thing you wanted to portray for the different cultures?

C.D: That forgiveness is a concept understood around the world. Evil is always with us in many shapes, but it’s how we deal with evil and change for the better that shapes our identities.

Toni: Amen! What would you choose for a life verse for the hero/heroine?

C.D: For Chip, John 14:27, “Peace I leave with you; My peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your heart be troubled, nor let it fear.”

Toni: I love that verse!

C.D: For Madison, Matthew 11:28-30, “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke on you and learn from me, because I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy to bear, and my load is not hard to carry.”

Toni: That’s another good one! Last but not least, what can readers do to support your writing journey?

C.D: Recommending the book to friends and leaving a review so others can find the book! Of course, I would love personal notes on how the story landed with each person.

Toni: Readers, do you have any questions or comments for C.D.?


About the Author

C.D. Gill caught the travel bug as a young girl. Now she integrates other cultures and faraway places into her fiction. Equally as important is her desire to lend a voice to those around world without one. Her favorite adventure buddy is her British pilot husband who doesn’t know how to sit still and whose stories have added fuel to her wild imagination.

Follow: Website, Facebook, Twitter, Newsletter

Author Interview with Brandi Boddie featuring “Dear One” (book)

Happy Monday, reader friends!

Let’s welcome Brandi Boddie to our blog today! She’s a returning guest. Today, Brandi is here to answer questions about her book “Dear One”. It’s the perfect read for Valentine’s Day!  She’s also going to share some of the race-related roadblocks she’s faced as an author of color writing about characters of color.

Enjoy your time with Brandi!


Interview with Brandi Boddie, author of Dear One (book):

Alexis: What inspired you to write a story about “Steel Town America during the midst of WWII” and call your story “Dear One”?

Brandi: Thanks for having me as a guest again, Alexis. During WWII, the “steel towns” were cities that were known for their high production of steel. This metal was highly needed to craft planes, tanks, and ammunition for the troops overseas. The more notable steel towns of the day were Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Birmingham, Alabama, and Trenton, New Jersey. The story is called “Dear One” because it’s part of a multi-author collection called Valentine Matchmakers. Each story is titled after a saying on those classic candy hearts. The company that manufactured the candy started putting “Dear One” on the hearts during the 1940s.

Alexis: Why did you choose Youngstown, Ohio as the setting for your story?

Brandi: I was born in Youngstown, Ohio. During the 1910s-70s, the city had numerous steel mills. During WWII, they were used to furnish vehicles and weapons. Many of my male relatives worked in these mills before going off to fight in the war or to college in the latter half of the century. I wanted to pay tribute to the hard-working people of the city and my family by recognizing part of Youngstown’s legacy.

Alexis: Describe the Valley Bulletin, the town’s most prominent African American newspaper. How many years did it take for it to rise up in the ranks?

Brandi: The Valley Bulletin is a fictional African American newspaper based on the real-life examples of black journalism during that time. Since African Americans didn’t often find work with white newspaper companies, they formed their own. The papers featured news of the day as told from an African American perspective, as well as entertainment, gossip and advice columns. This tradition continues today in major cities.

Alexis: How did your story’s heroine Molly Clayton become a “ladies columnist” for the Valley Bulletin?

Brandi: Molly took a few secretary and writing courses after high school, which enabled her to find employment with the Valley Bulletin. She loves to give practical advice on war rationing to ladies in her weekly column.

Alexis: Why are Molly’s parents struggling and in what ways does she help them?

Brandi: Molly’s father lost his job in the steel mill due to a work-related injury. She tries to help him find work by bringing home the classifieds in the Valley Bulletin. She helps her mother with the share of the household duties .

Alexis: Describe Molly’s passion for swing dancing. How and when did she start?

Brandi: Swing dancing, or Lindy Hop, was one of the big pastimes during the 30s and 40s. While money was tight, it didn’t cost much to attend a dance. Molly began dancing during high school and goes regularly to these social events in her spare time.

Alexis: What’s the significance of the “Valentine’s Day dance” that Molly is invited to by a friend?

Brandi: The Valentine’s Day dance has a romantic theme of music and dining. Molly has been working hard at the newspaper office lately, and a friend suggests she deserves a little time to enjoy herself.

Alexis: Let’s talk about your story’s hero, Stephen Keller. Describe his looks, personality and taste in music. What’s his motivation in this story?

Brandi: Stephen is tall and handsome with dark hair, hazel eyes, and tan skin. He has an outgoing personality and is an avid fan of jazz music. He’s a hard worker and talented talker, not to mention dancer. But he always feels the need to prove himself.

Alexis: Why did you make Stephen a jazz magazine editor?

Brandi: Stephen has relatives who are jazz musicians. This lively, soulful music is in his blood.

Alexis: What draws Molly to Stephen? Is there anything that makes her not like him later on in the story?

Brandi: Molly is drawn to Stephen’s charisma, both on the dancefloor and in his conversation. He’s passionate about music and making advances for people of color. He’s suave, and there’s a cultured element to his behavior and way of dress. However, there’s also an unspoken element that she can’t put her finger on.

Alexis: How does Stephen’s “painful secret” affect his relationship with Molly?

Brandi: It goes back to his need to always prove himself. He’s trying to escape from the memories of his past, as well as something he can’t change about himself. This leads Molly to see another side of his personality, one that’s sad and bitter.

Alexis: What were the challenges of writing this story? What were the rewards?

Brandi: While there are many WWII romances to read, few of them feature people of color. We know for a fact that black and brown American soldiers helped win the war. We also know that their families, friends, and love interests worried about them. Just like white women, black women did their part to send care packages and letters. They anticipated their husbands and boyfriends coming home. I wanted to tell such a story. It’s been amazing to write about a young black couple falling in love against the backdrop of a war that ended up changing the scope of how we view religious, ethnic, and moral grounds.

Alexis: As a woman of color, what are the challenges you’ve experienced in trying to publish your books about people of color with traditional CBA publishing houses?

Brandi: I’ve had books get canceled because they featured people of color. In earlier stages of query, I’ve had editors ask me the race of my characters before they even knew the plot. I think this is because, historically, people of color haven’t had an easy time in this country. Historical fiction has to deal with that reality or it can become very disingenuous. It’s my belief that certain settings and subject matter make publishing houses want to proceed with caution. However, the human race can’t heal and POC are not being served if their experiences are sugarcoated, glossed over, or not given a voice at all.

Alexis: Would you like to see more love stories featuring heroines of color, successfully published and marketed by CBA? Why or why not?

Brandi: I certainly would, but it has to reflect POC experiences and their unique journeys of faith. God doesn’t lead us all down the same path. I’d also like to see more heroines of color being featured in genres such as mystery and science fiction.

Alexis: If you could advise the marketing and sales departments in traditional CBA publishing houses on how to market books about people of color, what would you say?

Brandi: Be proactive about it. Survey readers of existing romance novels that feature POC. Ask them why they enjoyed the book and what they would like to see in the future. Also, bring authors of color to your conventions and conferences to be guest speakers. Have several panels on diversity (with POC as the panelists) to start the conversation.

As for in-store and online marketing, don’t be afraid to have covers featuring POC. I’ve seen too many books that featured ethnic characters, but had flowers or a vague landscape for the cover. Why can’t we see cover models for the characters?

Alexis: Thanks for the interview, Brandi! Do you have any closing thoughts?

Brandi: Thanks for inviting me again, Alexis. I enjoy reading your blog features. Thanks for sharing diverse stories with your readers.

*Interview conducted by Alexis A. Goring, contributor.


About the Author:

 Brandi Boddie writes historical and contemporary romance. She resides in Texas where she loves spending time with her husband and dogs, a cocker spaniel and a schnauzer who both aspire to be food critics. She holds a juris doctorate from Howard University School of Law and a B.A. in political science from Youngstown State University. She has worked for the Office of the Attorney General in Washington D.C. and traveled extensively across the country as a military wife. When she isn’t writing, Brandi enjoys fencing and swing dancing.

Visit her website www.brandiboddie.com for news and updates.

Follow Brandi on Twitter


About the Book:

Love in Steel Town America during the midst of WWII

Youngstown, Ohio 1944

Molly Clayton works as a ladies columnist for the Valley Bulletin, the town’s most prominent African American newspaper. Between writing, aiding the war effort, and helping her struggling parents pay the bills, she doesn’t have time for her favorite pastime of swing dancing.

When a friend gives her tickets to a Valentine’s Day dance for her birthday, Molly can’t wait to attend. She meets Stephen Keller, a handsome jazz magazine editor. She’s attracted to him, but a painful secret lurks beneath the surface of Stephen’s easy charm that makes him defensive to others and suspicious of her faith.

Things take a turn for the worse when a vicious rumor threatens to destroy both her career and her blossoming courtship. Will she gain the courage to confront the rumor and speak her heart to Stephen before it’s too late?

Open Discussion: Getting More Diverse Books in Your Local Libraries (and other ideas)

DBTP - letstalk

Happy Saturday, folks!

In past posts, we’ve been talking about the importance of introducing more diverse fiction into Christian fiction, why we love reading diverse fiction, why it’s important, what some of the roadblocks have been, and sharing some of our own stories.

Today I’d like to focus on some things we can do to bring more diverse fiction to our own neighborhoods. Because there are many ways to give at Christmas time and sometimes that can be a few extra minutes of our time! So, here are some of the ways I thought of:

  1. Go to your local library once per month and request a new diverse book they don’t have yet.
  2. Go to your local (non-chain) bookstore and request a diverse book that you’ve read and loved but don’t see on their shelves.
  3. Have a church group or a book club? Invite your favorite author of diverse books to speak. You never know, they might say yes! It means more sales for them and more exposure, plus added knowledge for our churches and book clubs!
  4. Have connections at your local schools or universities? See about getting more diverse fiction on their shelves or about inviting your favorite author of diverse fiction for a speaking engagement.
  5. When you read diverse books, make sure to write reviews on Amazon and Goodreads. This helps with sales and spreading the love!
  6. Consider writing diverse fiction, if you don’t already. Writing is sometimes as fun as reading (though it’s a bit more work). 🙂

What other ideas do you have about spreading the love of diverse fiction in your neck of the woods?

Comment below!

Book Spotlight: Summer Fireworks

Happy Wednesday, Reader Friends!

Thanks for stopping by Diversity Between the Pages.

Today, we’re featuring the lovely Joy Massenburge’s debut novella titled, “A Cry for Independence”. It is one of several novellas that are included in a boxed set called Summer Fireworks.

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About the book: 

Summer Fireworks is a 4th of July Romance Collection written by six multi-published, popular authors, and introducing three debut authors (including Joy Massenburge).

“A Cry for Independence” (novella within the Summer Fireworks boxed set)
By debut author Joy Massenburge

Blurb: Some cry wolf, Tammie Morris cries independence after another failed relationship. Can her son’s father, Q, come back into her life and convince her reuniting their family under God is the freedom her heart seeks.

Book purchase link: Amazon

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About the Author:

 Massenburge crafts the love stories of pastors and their kids. She was born the sixth child of a pastor. Thinking she had avoided the church scene, she married a football player. She joined him at Sam Houston State University where she earned her Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice. Then on signing day with the Green Bay Packers, Mr. Football advised her she would be a pastors wife instead…and they raised pastor’s kids; a son, a daughter, and a goddaughter.

With the kids married or off to college, she took the advice of her favorite author and joined ACFW and (coming from the more eastern side of the state) the not-so-local DFW (TX) chapter where she serves as Chaplain.

She resides in Tyler, Texas, where you can find her in the concession stand on a Friday night, curled up on her back porch with a book on a Saturday, or filling her five-acre country home with fifty plus people for a Blue Bell (ice cream) party.

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Book Spotlight: The Esther Paradigm by Sarah Monzon

Hello, fiction fans! Today’s featured book simply knocked my socks off! I did NOT see this one coming, the blurb didn’t much appeal to me but I took it for a spin since I enjoy the author’s work… Great romance, intense culture clash, and deep faith elements are all wrapped up in this engaging and entertaining story. Definitely a #mustread!

About the Book

The Esther Paradigm by Sarah MonzonHannah Pratt dreams of starting a school for the Bedouin clan she grew up with as a missionary kid, and finally her hopes are coming true. But shortly after she returns to the desert from her college years in the U.S., she discovers her parents have received threats from their Muslim neighbors. As the danger escalates, Hannah finds she’s in the middle of a battle no one seems to understand. She must decide to what lengths she’ll go to stay faithful to the mission to which God has called her. Even if it costs her everything.

As sheikh, Karim Al-Amir feels the weight of responsibility as the leader of his people. When a mysterious illness ravishes the clan’s flocks and threatens to destroy their centuries-old way of life, locals believe the American doctors and their daughter, his childhood friend, Hannah, are to blame. Karim must do something to keep them safe—even if the only solution can be found within marriage vows.

In a society where the line is drawn between us and them, Christianity is outlawed, and foreigners are mistrusted, will their union heal wounds or inflict the final fatal blow?

goodreads | amazon

 

RT Book Reviews The Esther Paradigm review quote

 

About the Author

Sarah MonzonSarah Monzon is a Navy chaplain’s wife and a stay at home mom to the two cutest littles in the world. Playing pretend all day with them isn’t enough, she spends the evenings after their heads hit the pillow to create her own imaginary characters.

When she isn’t in the world of make believe, she can be found in a small desert town in central Washington taking care of her family, fostering friendships, and enjoying all the adventures each day brings.

website | facebook | twitter | pinterest

 

What are your first impressions, reader friends? 

Karim Al-Amir character spotlight on Faithfully Bookish

spotlight by Beth Erin

Open Discussion – NaNoWriMo

DBTP - letstalk

Happy Saturday, folks! We’ve had several discussions about our favorite diverse Christian reads and why it is so important to have more diverse Christian fiction out there. So, today’s blog is both a discussion and a call-to-action!

Are you tired of people writing characters from your culture the wrong way? Or not seeing anyone from your culture represented in Christian fiction? Well, there’s a sure-fire way to fix it. Write a book yourself!

November is National Novel Writing Month! It is where all over the world thousands (maybe millions) of people have taken up the torch to write a book in a month (50,000 words in 30 days). There are tons of supportive people out there to help you both online and in person. Find where your home region is on the NaNoWriMo website.

Personally, I have fallen in love with NaNo. Prior to NaNo, it took me 3+ years to write a book. Since starting NaNo 5 years ago, I have written 10 books. And my first published book, Vivir el Dream, was actually written during NaNo.

NaNo is just a big ball of awesomeness. There are so many people that have said, “Wow, you write books? I always wanted to do that.” If you’re one of those people, that could be the Holy Spirit nudging you. Does God want you to write a book? If so, don’t be like Jonah and go the other direction. Let NaNo swallow you up and bring you to authorship! (Okay, I had a bit of fun with that analogy).

Here’s the discussion part…Do you write books? Have you ever done NaNoWriMo? Have you ever considered writing a book? Are you interested in trying out NaNo this year and want more info?

Remember: God doesn’t call the equipped, He equips the called. 🙂 Have a blessed Saturday!

Book Review: The Samurai’s Heart by Walt Mussell

About the Book

Japan, 1587. Sen must find a husband to marry into her family’s swordsmith business. She seeks a Christian husband, though Christianity is banned.

Enter Nobuhiro. Third son of a high-level samurai, Nobuhiro fled his harsh father and apprenticed himself to a swordsmith. He yearns to prove his worth.

They seem an ideal match. But for Sen, the choice is faith or family. For Nobuhiro, choosing a Christian ends any reconciliation with his family. Can love be forged from the impossible?

goodreads | amazon

 

My Thoughts

This book’s rare setting alone is enough to tempt a horde of historical fiction fans. The story is saturated with the everyday culture and historical climate of late-sixteenth century Japan as well as a healthy dose of suspense and a dash of romance. After months of eager anticipation, I’m so pleased to share my experience of this intriguing literary journey.

Sen is an innocent young woman who is devoted to her faith and her family. As the only living child of her parents, Sen’s duty is to marry and ensure the family business and family name lives on. Simple, right?! Wrong! The ban on Christianity complicates her search for a good husband and endangers her life.

Nobuhiro is completely dedicated to his work and to the master swordsmith he is apprenticing under. While he has tight bonds with his brothers, Nobuhiro is estranged from his father yet still desperate to make him proud. Nobuhiro sets the bar high for himself and bends over backwards to care for his master’s family.

Take your time to savor the little things in this story and a slower pace will help keep those long unfamiliar names from becoming a stumbling block. This book is first in a three part series and while Sen and Naobuhiro’s story came to a satisfying conclusion, there seems to be a suspense thread that will continue throughout the series. Now onto the next order of business, eagerly anticipating the release of book 2!

I received the opportunity to read this book through the Kindle Scout program. The opinions expressed are my own.
This Review was originally posted on Faithfully Bookish.

 

About the Author

Walt MussellWalt Mussell lives in an Atlanta-area suburb with his wife and their two boys. He works for a well-known corporation and writes in his spare time.

Walt primarily writes historicals, with a particular focus on Japan, an interest he gained during the four years he lived there. He refers to his work as “Like Shogun, but the heroine survives.”

Outside of writing, his favorite activity is trying to keep up with his kids. As they are both teenagers, this is proving more difficult each day.

website | facebook | twitter

 

I highly recommend this one, reader friends!
Enter to win The Samurai’s Heart here and here!
What are your thoughts?

 

Reviewed by Beth Erin

Open Discussion: What Diverse Books Have You Read Lately?

DBTP - letstalk

Hello, fellow diverse book readers! Happy Saturday! Summer is officially over and fall has begun. The perfect time to curl up with a diverse read and drink a mug of hot chocolate or spiced cider or pumpkin spice coffee. 🙂

The question of the day is: what have you read lately in diverse fiction? And/or what’s on your reading list? We want to grow our list of diverse fiction and the only way that works is hearing from others about what they have read or have heard is awesome!

Comment below with your recent diverse reads.

Open Discussion – How to Deal with Prejudice/Racism towards Diverse Books

DBTP - letstalkHappy Saturday, Diverse Book Readers!

I hope everyone has had a lovely week. There has been a lot of negative news in the last few days, so I am glad to have a place like this where people can encourage each other and where we can see that there is hope for a brighter, more diverse future in literature and the world in general.

With the current volatile climate towards diversity, diverse books are more important than ever. Diverse books throughout time have changed people’s views and hearts.

But still there will be people who are angry about diversity and who may even quote scripture or use their words of hatred to quell excitement about diverse books.

This week’s question is: What should we do (or what have you done) when confronted with prejudice or racism towards diverse literature? And what are some of your favorite diverse books that have made a difference in the world?

Please comment below! We can all learn from each other. 🙂

Discussion by Allison K. Garcia